Welcome to the TD Canadian Children’s Book Week Site

TD Canadian Children's Book Week 2016

Saturday, May 7 - Saturday, May 14, 2016

APPLY NOW TO HOST A BOOK WEEK VISITOR!

Join us in celebrating TD Canadian Children's Book Week and bring the magic of books and reading to children all across Canada!

The next TD Canadian Children’s Book Week touring program will run from Saturday, May 7 to Saturday, May 14, 2016. Twenty-nine Canadian children’s authors, illustrator and storytellers will be visiting schools, libraries, community centres and bookstores across Canada throughout the week.

TD Canadian Children's Book Week is the single most important national event celebrating Canadian children's books and the importance of reading. Over 28,000 children, teens and adults participate in activities held in every province and territory across the country. Hundreds of schools, public libraries, bookstores and community centres host events as part of this major literary festival.

TD Canadian Children's Book Week is organized by the Canadian Children's Book Centre, in partnership with the Storytellers of Canada/Conteurs du Canada, and is made possible through the generous support of our sponsors and funders.

Recently at Book Week

From Author Readings to Literacy Parades, the 39th Annual TD Canadian Children's Book Week and Reading Town Canada Cultivates a Joy of Reading

Twenty-nine of the country's most celebrated children's authors, illustrators and storytellers will visit libraries, schools, community centres and bookstores across Canada from May 7th to May 14th as part of the 39th annual TD Canadian Children's Book Week. Sponsored by TD Bank Group in collaboration with the Canadian Children's Book Centre (CCBC), TD Canadian Children's Book Week is the largest national event celebrating Canadian children's books and the importance of reading. Each May, during the week-long event, more than 400 live book readings and activities are provided for 28,000 children in every province and territory across Canada.

Sylvan Learning Helps to Celebrate TD Canadian Children’s Book Week

Sylvan Learning Centres across Canada are excited to participate in the single most important national event celebrating Canadian children’s books and the importance of reading. To celebrate this event they are sponsoring a reading contest. You can have your students enter this contest by choosing a book written by a favourite Canadian author. Please submit entries to the nearest Sylvan Learning Centre to have a chance of winning a prize.

Primary (K-3): Students must submit an illustration of the most interesting event in the story or write three sentences why they liked the book.

Intermediate (4-7): Students must write at least five sentences explaining why they liked the book.

High school (8-12): Students must write a paragraph explaining why they would recommend this book to a friend.

Make sure to visit Sylvanlearning.ca for the Sylvan Learning Centre nearest you.

Contest rules: All entries must be submitted by May 14, 2016. Contest winner is decided by participating Sylvan Learning Centres and all decisions are final. Winners will be contacted by phone or email by May 31, 2016.

Volunteer Drivers Needed for TD Book Week 2016

The Canadian Children’s Book Centre is looking for volunteer drivers to help authors, illustrators and storytellers get to and from their presentations during TD Canadian Children’s Book Week 2016 (May 7-14, 2016).

This is a wonderful opportunity to meet Canadian creators while helping them reach young readers all across the country. Drivers must have access to a personal vehicle. Mileage will be reimbursed at the rate of $0.40 per kilometre.

If you are interested in helping, please contact Shannon Howe Barnes, Program Coordinator at shannon@bookcentre.ca or 416.975.0010 x 227. Please include your city and province and we will contact you should there be any opportunities in your area.

CCBC Announces Tour Roster for TD Canadian Children’s Book Week 2016!

The Canadian Children’s Book Centre is excited to announce the authors, illustrators and storytellers who will be touring for TD Canadian Children’s Book Week 2016 (May 7 – 14, 2016).

TD Canadian Children's Book Week is the single most important national event celebrating Canadian children's books and the importance of reading. Over 28,000 children, teens and adults participate in activities held in every province and territory across the country. Hundreds of schools, public libraries, bookstores and community centres host events as part of this major literary festival.

Visit the TD Book Week site (www.bookweek.ca) in October to find out what province/territory each of these creators will be touring and the types of readings and workshops they will be giving. Schools, libraries, bookstores and community centres interested in hosting a Book Week visitor can apply online starting mid-October.

For more information, please contact:
Shannon Howe Barnes
Program Coordinator
416 975-0010 x 227
shannon@bookcentre.ca

Winners Announced for Book Week 2015 Writing Contest

TORONTO — May 6, 2015 — The Canadian Children’s Book Centre (CCBC) is excited to announce the winners of the Book Week 2015 Writing Contest for Kids & Teens. Over 900 entries were received from young writers in every province and territory across the country.

The national contest is a much-anticipated part of TD Canadian Children's Book Week — the largest celebration of Canadian books for young people in Canada, which is happening now (Saturday, May 2 to Saturday, May 9, 2015).

The winner from each grade will receive a $250 gift certificate for the bookstore of his or her choice. Two honourable mentions from each grade category will also receive $50 gift certificates.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Interviews

Susan White

How did you get started in children’s books?
I read a lot as a child. I loved walking to the Fredericton Public library on Saturday mornings and then walking back up the hill with an armload of hard covered books. When I had my children I read many wonderful books to them. I became an elementary school teacher and my favorite part of the day and of my interaction with my students during my 29 years of teaching was the time I spent reading to them. Over the years I returned to many of the same wonderful books while at the same time always stumbling on another treasure. At all those stages my desire to write books for children was deeply formed. After retiring from teaching I began writing full time and now return to classrooms often as an author.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Interviews

Lori Weber

How did you get started in children’s books?
I actually began publishing work for adults – short stories and poetry – when I was in my 20s; in my late 20s I began working on my first novel, although I didn’t know it was a novel at the time. It was a series of vignettes, recollected from my childhood in Park Extension (Montreal). Over the years those vignettes formed a novel and, when I eventually sent it out, it was Kathy Lowinger, the well-respected children’s book editor, who said it would make a wonderful young adult novel. Ten whole years, and many revisions, later, it was published as Split, my second novel. In between, I wrote another YA novel, Klepto, which became my first published book in 2004. I guess you could say that once I discovered the genre, I was hooked. It was a perfect fit for the subject matter I had always tackled – adolescence – and my image-oriented but sparse writing style. I fell into it willy-nilly but quite happily. I’ve always been a fan of children’s books.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Interviews

Anne Villeneuve

How did you get started in children’s books?
I simply loved drawing when I was young. I was drawing all the time, every day. Even my grade 4 math teacher put me in the corner, because I had drawn a big sun on the cover of my math book! I had to do something with this passion for drawing. I started drawing for children when I was 20, and this was 28 years ago. So if you are somewhat good in math, you should know how old I am...

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Interviews

Chieri Uegaki

How did you get started in children’s books?
I basically lost two writing competitions. After many years of not writing regularly, I decided I needed to kick start things so I signed up for a couple of refresher courses, including one for writing for children. That particular class inspired me to re-work a much longer piece I’d written back at the University of British Columbia (where I received my degree in Creative Writing) into a picture book manuscript. Then, I entered a children’s literature competition sponsored by the Asian Canadian Writers’ Workshop. I didn’t win, but I was shortlisted. This gave me the confidence to try again, and luckily, found out about a similar competition sponsored by The Writers’ Union of Canada. Again, I didn’t win, but I was again shortlisted. This time, though, the list of shortlisted manuscripts was forwarded to three Canadian children’s book publishers. Two publishers expressed interest in seeing my story, and Kids Can Press came back with an offer to publish. This was how my first picture book, Suki’s Kimono, came to be. I had such a wonderful time working on this project, and it felt like such a good fit for me (I have always enjoyed reading everything from picture books to YA fiction) that I decided to continue pursuing writing for children.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Interviews

Meg Tilly

How did you get started in children’s books?
I had two adult novels published. My first, Singing Songs, followed the child protagonist from age four through twelve. In my second novel, the antagonist was thirty-six, but again, the protagonist was twelve years old.

Kathy Lowinger, who at that time worked for Tundra, read my second novel and contacted me. She said I really captured a young girl’s voice and wondered if I ever considered writing YA. I didn’t know what YA meant, but once I found out, I really wanted to try. I wrote Porcupine for grades 5-7 and loved the whole experience.

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