Welcome to the TD Canadian Children’s Book Week Site

Book Week 2013: Lorna Schultz Nicholson

TD Canadian Children's Book Week 2014

Saturday, May 3 - Saturday, May 10, 2014

Join us in celebrating TD Canadian Children's Book Week and bring the magic of books and reading to children all across Canada!

The next TD Canadian Children’s Book Week touring program will run from Saturday, May 3 to Saturday, May 10, 2014. Twenty-nine Canadian children’s authors, illustrator and storytellers will be visiting schools, libraries, community centres and bookstores across Canada throughout the week.

TD Canadian Children's Book Week is the single most important national event celebrating Canadian children's books and the importance of reading. Over 25,000 children, teens and adults participate in activities held in every province and territory across the country. Hundreds of schools, public libraries, bookstores and community centres host events as part of this major literary festival.

This site contains valuable information about the history of Book Week; the plans for this year’s touring program; the costs involved in hosting a reading; information about the touring authors, illustrators and storytellers and the presentations they do; contact information for the Book Week Coordinators who are organizing the tours in your province or territory; and information about our popular Book Week materials which can be used to celebrate Canadian books in the classroom, library or at home.

TD Canadian Children's Book Week is organized by the Canadian Children's Book Centre, in partnership with the Storytellers of Canada/Conteurs du Canada, and is made possible through the generous support of our sponsors and funders.

Experience the Magic of Book Week
In 2013, author Jennifer Lanthier visited schools and libraries in Labrador with her daughter, Nicola Lanthier-Rogers, during TD Canadian Children's Book Week. Nicola, an aspiring filmmaker, captured the true impact and importance of the Book Week tours in this beautiful short film.

Recently at Book Week

Book Week Theme Guide: Read to Remember

Book Week Theme Guide 2014: Read to Remember

The 2014 Book Week theme guide is now available. It focuses on 70 books that explore Canada's involvement in past wars, as well as today’s wars, and provides activities for using these books in the classroom or library. Click here to access the theme guide.

Vimy Ridge Day Contest

The Vimy Ridge Contest is now closed. Thank you to everyone who submitted pictures! Click here to see the entries.

TD Canadian Children’s Book Week is approaching (May 3-10, 2014) and the theme this year is Read to Remember. To inspire students in the weeks leading up to TD Book Week, the CCBC would like to honour Vimy Ridge Day on April 9th by encouraging children and teenagers to visit or create a war memorial in their community or school.

Send us a picture of a local cenotaph or war memorial statue and we will showcase these pictures on www.bookweek.ca. Alternatively, you can create a memorial at your school—students could make a paper project, a mural image, a wall of paper poppies, etc. Veterans Affairs Canada has suggestions for activities with younger children.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Author Interviews

Catherine Austen

1. How did you get started in children’s books?

In my teens and twenties, I wrote short fiction for adults. But once I had kids, I read so many great children's books with them and I saw how excited they get about a book they love, that I really wanted to write for young people. So I gave it a try and now I'm getting the hang of it.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Author Interviews

Kathy Stinson

1. How did you get started in children’s books?

I’d been saying to myself for a while “maybe someday I’ll write” when I left teaching to be a stay-at-home mom. I guess it was reading picture books to my own kids that spurred me finally to decide that if “maybe someday” I might write, why not today? Once I decided that, my kids kindly co-operated by providing the inspiration for my first two books: Red Is Best and Big Or Little?

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Author Interviews

Georgia Graham

1. How did you get started in children’s books?

I had an instructor in art college who loved children's books. That's when I got the fever. After I graduated I moved to Central Alberta near Red Deer. I took my portfolio into the publisher of Red Deer Press. I was asked to illustrate my first picture book, The Most Beautiful in the World.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Author Interviews

Jill Bryant

1. How did you get started in children’s books?

At university, I rediscovered kids’ books and developed a strong passion for them while working at a summer resort as a children’s supervisor. Several years later, while working in-house as an editor, the publisher wanted a manuscript—quickly. I don’t think she was entirely serious but she said, “Jill could write it.” I seized the moment and Sew Your Own Bean Bag Friends was published in 1998.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Author Interviews

Sharon McKay

1. How did you get started in children’s books?

I wrote Charlie Wilcox, a book about a boy in Newfoundland. The plan was to write about “going to the ice”, sealing around the turn of the last century 1900’s. Hummmm.

The story took a mad turn – right into World War I. Oh my, there was so much to learn.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Author Interviews

Helaine Becker

1. How did you get started in children’s books?

I'd always wanted to be a writer, ever since I began reading! But it wasn't until I was grown up and had children of my own that I dared to take the plunge. I started jotting down funny poems... and things mushroomed from there.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Author Interviews

Susan Mitchell

1. How did you get started in children’s books?

I have been drawing ever since I can remember and have always loved children’s books but didn’t really attempt to make a living at it until after my son was born. I created a portfolio with Christmas card illustrations that I had done, submitted it to publishers and got my first book contract with Simon and Schuster in 2002. I have been illustrating ever since.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Author Interviews

Karen Bass

1. How did you get started in children’s books?

My interest in writing fiction didn't take root until after I went to work at the public library, when my daughter was four years old. Even then, I started out writing short stories and adult fantasy. Then I went to a rather dry presentation about writing grants, and during it I had an “Aha!” moment, where two ideas—my interest in WWII and my cousin having gone on a Rotary student exchange—came together. The result was my first YA novel, Run Like Jager. The age of the main character (an exchange student) pushed the story into the YA category, and along the way I learned that I loved telling and reading YA stories. I suspect that my inner teenager is a 16-year-old guy.

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