Welcome to the TD Canadian Children’s Book Week Site

TD Canadian Children's Book Week 2016

Saturday, May 7 - Saturday, May 14, 2016

FIND OUT WHAT PUBLIC BOOK WEEK EVENTS ARE IN YOUR AREA!

Join us in celebrating TD Canadian Children's Book Week and bring the magic of books and reading to children all across Canada!

The next TD Canadian Children’s Book Week touring program will run from Saturday, May 7 to Saturday, May 14, 2016. Twenty-nine Canadian children’s authors, illustrator and storytellers will be visiting schools, libraries, community centres and bookstores across Canada throughout the week.

TD Canadian Children's Book Week is the single most important national event celebrating Canadian children's books and the importance of reading. Over 28,000 children, teens and adults participate in activities held in every province and territory across the country. Hundreds of schools, public libraries, bookstores and community centres host events as part of this major literary festival.

TD Canadian Children's Book Week is organized by the Canadian Children's Book Centre, in partnership with the Storytellers of Canada/Conteurs du Canada, and is made possible through the generous support of our sponsors and funders.

Recently at Book Week

Call for Applications: TD Canadian Children's Book Week 2017

The Canadian Children's Book Centre is looking for authors and/or illustrators with new children’s books being released in the period from Spring 2016 to Spring 2017 who are interested in touring schools, libraries, bookstores and community centres outside of their home province during TD Canadian Children’s Book Week 2017. The next Book Week tour will run from Saturday, May 6 to Saturday, May 13, 2017.

The deadline for applications is Friday, July 8, 2016.

Authors and illustrators who are interested in touring should visit the Book Week website under Information for Artists for complete application details and to download the application form.

TD Canadian Children's Book Week is a wonderful opportunity for authors and illustrators to promote their work to young readers across the country. The authors and illustrators who are chosen to tour for Book Week will be invited to give readings and/or workshops in schools, libraries, community centres and bookstores in the province/territory they are assigned to tour.

From Author Readings to Literacy Parades, the 39th Annual TD Canadian Children's Book Week and Reading Town Canada Cultivates a Joy of Reading

Twenty-nine of the country's most celebrated children's authors, illustrators and storytellers will visit libraries, schools, community centres and bookstores across Canada from May 7th to May 14th as part of the 39th annual TD Canadian Children's Book Week. Sponsored by TD Bank Group in collaboration with the Canadian Children's Book Centre (CCBC), TD Canadian Children's Book Week is the largest national event celebrating Canadian children's books and the importance of reading. Each May, during the week-long event, more than 400 live book readings and activities are provided for 28,000 children in every province and territory across Canada.

Sylvan Learning Helps to Celebrate TD Canadian Children’s Book Week

Sylvan Learning Centres across Canada are excited to participate in the single most important national event celebrating Canadian children’s books and the importance of reading. To celebrate this event they are sponsoring a reading contest. You can have your students enter this contest by choosing a book written by a favourite Canadian author. Please submit entries to the nearest Sylvan Learning Centre to have a chance of winning a prize.

Primary (K-3): Students must submit an illustration of the most interesting event in the story or write three sentences on why they liked the book.

Intermediate (4-7): Students must write at least five sentences explaining why they liked the book.

High school (8-12): Students must write a paragraph explaining why they would recommend this book to a friend.

Make sure to visit Sylvanlearning.ca for the Sylvan Learning Centre nearest you.

Contest rules: All entries must be submitted by May 14, 2016. Contest winner is decided by participating Sylvan Learning Centres and all decisions are final. Winners will be contacted by phone or email by May 31, 2016.

TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Interviews

Wesley King

How did you get started in children’s books?
I think it was always inevitable that my writing would gravitate toward children’s books, as the content and storytelling that I have always loved lends itself to the demographic. Also because I am literally just a large child. I love seeing the reactions of young readers and I know very well the magic of a truly immersive novel during those transitional years.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Interviews

Wallace Edwards

How did you get started in children’s books?
I used to be a freelance illustrator for magazines and books. I eventually felt a strong need to create a series of paintings that were just for the fun of it and not a commissioned assignment. That series of paintings became my first book, Alphabeasts (Kids Can Press, 2002). I enjoyed the process so much I have been trying to make books that are fun for me and hopefully for the reader ever since.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Interviews

Vicki Grant

How did you get started in children’s books?
By accident. I’d been working in children’s television and travelling a lot. I wanted to take a few months off, just to regroup, hang out with my kids, deal with the landfill of laundry that had appeared in my absence, etc. But I ran into an old friend from my time as an advertising copywriter and asked what she’d been up to. “I wrote a YA novel,” she said. I’d never until that moment considered writing a book, but the thought popped into my head, “If Kristi can do it, so can I.” I started the next day. Six months later I’d written The Puppet Wrangler, and I was hooked. (The laundry still hasn’t been dealt with.)

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Interviews

Tiffany Stone

How did you get started in children’s books?
My grade 6 teacher, Mrs Pudek, turned me on to writing poetry and Dennis Lee’s poem “Alligator Pie” turned me on to writing poetry that rhymed. (I can still recite the verse I wrote about Alligator Cake.) Maybe if I’d lived in Wordsworth’s day, I could have had a career writing rhyming poetry for adults but nowadays rhyming is mostly associated with poetry for kids. And that’s perfect for me. Kids—especially those in the 3-9 age group I write for—are just getting the hang of language and are usually more open to playing around with it than lots of adults, who tend to have forgotten how fun sounds and words can be.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Interviews

Simon Rose

How did you get started in children’s books?
I always had lots of ideas for stories but never thought about creating my own novels until I became a parent. Around that time the Harry Potter books appeared, as well as The Golden Compass and its sequels, and these books inspired me to create stories about the topics that interested me, such as history, time travel, the paranormal, superheroes, and ancient mysteries. The first novel, The Alchemist’s Portrait, was published in 2003 and the others followed on a regular basis. Future Imperfect was published in March 2016 and is my tenth novel for young adults.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Interviews

Sharon Jennings

How did you get started in children’s books?
I was a textbook editor working on primary language arts, and at the same time, I started my family. Immersed in children’s books pretty much 24/7, I was inspired to get creative, using my three children as “material”.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Interviews

Sarah Ellis

How did you get started in children’s books?
My start came through reading. You know that 10,000 hour theory of mastery? I think I spent 10,000 hours reading and listening to stories by the time I was 18. I didn’t know I was learning to be a writer, but that’s what I was doing, and it was the best kind of learning – learning via pleasure.

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