Welcome to the TD Canadian Children’s Book Week Site

Book Week 2013: Lorna Schultz Nicholson

TD Canadian Children's Book Week 2015

Saturday, May 2 - Saturday, May 9, 2015

Join us in celebrating TD Canadian Children's Book Week and bring the magic of books and reading to children all across Canada!

The next TD Canadian Children’s Book Week touring program will run from Saturday, May 2 to Saturday, May 9, 2015. Twenty-nine Canadian children’s authors, illustrator and storytellers will be visiting schools, libraries, community centres and bookstores across Canada throughout the week.

TD Canadian Children's Book Week is the single most important national event celebrating Canadian children's books and the importance of reading. Over 28,000 children, teens and adults participate in activities held in every province and territory across the country. Hundreds of schools, public libraries, bookstores and community centres host events as part of this major literary festival.

This site contains valuable information about the history of Book Week; the plans for this year’s touring program; the costs involved in hosting a reading; information about the touring authors, illustrators and storytellers and the presentations they do; contact information for the Book Week Coordinators who are organizing the tours in your province or territory; and information about our popular Book Week materials which can be used to celebrate Canadian books in the classroom, library or at home.

TD Canadian Children's Book Week is organized by the Canadian Children's Book Centre, in partnership with the Storytellers of Canada/Conteurs du Canada, and is made possible through the generous support of our sponsors and funders.

Experience the Magic of Book Week
In 2013, author Jennifer Lanthier visited schools and libraries in Labrador with her daughter, Nicola Lanthier-Rogers, during TD Canadian Children's Book Week. Nicola, an aspiring filmmaker, captured the true impact and importance of the Book Week tours in this beautiful short film.

Recently at Book Week

TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Interviews

Jerry Haigh

How did you get started in storytelling?

Without realizing it I have been a teller for a long time. My former students at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine have told me that most of my classes were more like storytelling than formal lectures. Quite by chance I took some voice lessons from a drama teacher at the university who called me a storyteller after I had related a story about some work I had done on chimpanzees in Uganda. After I joined the Saskatoon Storytellers Guild I attended my first formal storytelling conference in Saskatoon and was asked to tell a brief account of the effects of having safari ants up my shorts. From there I continued to enjoy sharing accounts of real wildlife adventures and learning old folk tales about the animals I have worked with.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Interviews

Jacqueline Guest

How did you get started in children’s books?

I know the value in reading. It’s the one skill you learn in school that you will use every day for the rest of your life! But to acquire reading skills, kids need to read – this means there has to be interesting books waiting on the shelf. I wanted to create books that would entertain young readers and keep them turning the pages.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Author Interviews

Lee Edward Födi

How did you get started in children’s books?

I’ve always been a writer. My mom says I was making stories as soon as I could pick up a crayon. I wrote a lot of books as a kid—and they were always books (not just stories). They had covers, title pages, even copyright pages (I don’t think I knew exactly what a copyright page was, but I just copied what I saw in real books). The earliest book I have record of is a hand-made one from when I was five or six. It’s called The Farm 7720. Why is it called that? I have NO idea.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Author Interviews

Kim Firmston

How did you get started in storytelling?

Well, I first began writing books for adults but even then I wanted to write for kids. I was reading kids’ books—especially picture books—even before I had kids of my own. Finally I decided that I had to try. My first two books were adaptations of old stories. It was only with my third book that I tried an original story. My confidence has been growing ever since.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Author Interviews

Cary Fagan

How did you get started in storytelling?

Well, I first began writing books for adults but even then I wanted to write for kids. I was reading kids’ books—especially picture books—even before I had kids of my own. Finally I decided that I had to try. My first two books were adaptations of old stories. It was only with my third book that I tried an original story. My confidence has been growing ever since.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Author Interviews

Gail de Vos

How did you get started in storytelling?

My mother would say that I started storytelling the moment I could string two words together but I did not officially begin my career as a storyteller until I was much older. I had travelled around South East Asia and Australia after I graduated with my B.Ed. but when I returned home, instead of teaching, I got married, had two daughters and decided to return to university to become a librarian. Because my daughters were still quite young I chose an evening course as my first foray back into the academic world. The course was storytelling, not a course I particularly wanted to take as I had dreams of being a research librarian working with ideas, not necessarily people. When I initially took the course I thought that it might help with parenting skills but….what I discovered absolutely changed the direction of my life!

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Author Interviews

Claudia Dávila

How did you get started in children’s books?

When I was the Art Director at Chirp & Chickadee magazines, my desk was right next to the Art Director's at Owl Books, and I thought about what fun it would be to work on a whole kids' book! Fiction or non-fiction, I love children's books – I started out designing them, then illustrating them, and eventually writing them!

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Author Interviews

Jan L. Coates

How did you get started in children’s books?

Since I got my first library card when I was five, I suppose 1965 would be the exact answer. My mum owned a bookstore for the last 25 years of her life, so my kids were immersed in stories from birth. After a few years of reading to them, especially picture books, I decided to give it a try. Writing had always been my favourite part of school, and I’d dabbled in creative writing over the years. I wrote a few picture book manuscripts and one of them placed second in the 2002 Atlantic Writing Competition. I thought for sure publication was bound to follow, but I’m still revising that story - then called “Sam’s Magic Cape.” If I’ve learned one thing about writing, it’s that persistence is essential.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Author Interviews

Hugh Brewster

How did you get started in children’s books?

I began my working career as a children’s book editor for Scholastic — just when their Canadian publishing program was beginning. (One of our first authors was fourteen-year-old Gordon Korman!) I later became the editorial director of Madison Press Books in Toronto. In 1995 I had commissioned an author to write the text for an illustrated book about the last Tsar’s youngest daughter but other deadlines made it impossible for her to do this. So I decided to write the book myself. When Anastasia’s Album was published in 1996 it proved to be quite popular and won both the Silver Birch and Red Cedar awards. I discovered that I enjoyed giving school talks and meeting young readers and this encouraged me to write more books.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Author Interviews

Andrea Beck

How did you get started in children’s books?

I had, at one time, been a toy designer and during those years liked to imagine that somehow by sewing, stuffing and brushing the toys they were imbued with a form of “toy” life. I loved stories of toys coming to life and began to dabble in writing stories when my children were young. This was inspired mostly by reading to them at bedtime. One day Elliot Moose appeared in my head and he would not go away. He bashed on the door of my brain until I let him out in his very first story, when I submitted the story to a publisher, voila!, my first book was born.

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