Welcome to the TD Canadian Children’s Book Week Site

Book Week 2013: Lorna Schultz Nicholson

TD Canadian Children's Book Week 2015

Saturday, May 2 - Saturday, May 9, 2015

Join us in celebrating TD Canadian Children's Book Week and bring the magic of books and reading to children all across Canada!

The next TD Canadian Children’s Book Week touring program will run from Saturday, May 2 to Saturday, May 9, 2015. Twenty-nine Canadian children’s authors, illustrator and storytellers will be visiting schools, libraries, community centres and bookstores across Canada throughout the week.

TD Canadian Children's Book Week is the single most important national event celebrating Canadian children's books and the importance of reading. Over 28,000 children, teens and adults participate in activities held in every province and territory across the country. Hundreds of schools, public libraries, bookstores and community centres host events as part of this major literary festival.

This site contains valuable information about the history of Book Week; the plans for this year’s touring program; the costs involved in hosting a reading; information about the touring authors, illustrators and storytellers and the presentations they do; contact information for the Book Week Coordinators who are organizing the tours in your province or territory; and information about our popular Book Week materials which can be used to celebrate Canadian books in the classroom, library or at home.

TD Canadian Children's Book Week is organized by the Canadian Children's Book Centre, in partnership with the Storytellers of Canada/Conteurs du Canada, and is made possible through the generous support of our sponsors and funders.

Experience the Magic of Book Week
In 2013, author Jennifer Lanthier visited schools and libraries in Labrador with her daughter, Nicola Lanthier-Rogers, during TD Canadian Children's Book Week. Nicola, an aspiring filmmaker, captured the true impact and importance of the Book Week tours in this beautiful short film.

Recently at Book Week

TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Interviews

Shane Peacock

How did you get started in children’s books?

I didn’t get started as a children’s book writer as part of a career plan. I simply wanted to be a writer and had studied Literature at university. I began writing short stories for adults and trying my hand at a novel for adults, as well as writing journalism for magazines. A trip to Newfoundland, where I went on an ocean kayaking trip with my wife and my brother and his wife changed things. We visited a ghost town on an island there and it occurred to me that I could write a great adventure novel about it and that the best protagonist was a young boy. A year or so later, I had published the YA novel The Mystery of Ireland’s Eye. It was nominated for a number of awards and writing for children became a big part of my work as a professional author.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Interviews

Lesley Livingston

How did you get started in children’s books?

My first published YA novels were my Wondrous Strange books. They combined my love of theatre, Shakespeare, New York and myth. I’d already been a stage actor for some time and the company I was with had performed a lot of Shakespeare for high school audiences over the years. And I have to say – young audiences are the BEST audiences. Because if you tell the story properly and you can get them – really get them – to engage, they will give you back all of the energy and intensity you send out to them and then some. I knew that when I started really writing to be read, that that was the kind of readership I wanted to reach. Young and hungry for stories.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Interviews

Laura Langston

How did you get started in children’s books?

I wanted to be a writer by the time I was in Grade Four. I simply knew writing was my path in life. So after my first child was born, I switched from a career in broadcast journalism to writing. I wrote magazine and newspaper articles as well as books for children, teens and adults. I started writing picture books when my children were young. As they grew and began to read longer books, I found myself drawn to writing longer books too. So in many ways, my path reflected their growing up years.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Interviews

Rob Laidlaw

Rob Laidlaw

How did you get started in children’s books?

For many years I had been writing reports, briefs and the occasional article as part of my job as the director of a wildlife protection organization. During that time I’d never really given much thought to writing books. Then in 2008 I received a call from a publishing company requesting a meeting. I assumed they wanted me to provide recommendations of other people to write a book about something to do with animals or nature, so I was quite surprised when they asked me to write a children’s book about zoos and the challenges that animals in zoos face. I thought it was a great idea and it was certainly a topic I knew a lot about, so I agreed to do it. I honestly didn’t think very many kids would read the book, but it turned out I was wrong. That first book, Wild Animals in Captivity, did very well and has led to a succession of others, all of them about animals.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Interviews

Tanya Lloyd Kyi

Tanya Lloyd Kyi

How did you get started in children’s books?

I was working as a graphic designer for Whitecap Books, and they were looking for someone to write a Canadian version of Girls Who Rocked the World. I think I happened to walk by the publisher’s office at just the right moment!

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Interviews

Rukhsana Khan

How did you get started in children’s books?

Well, I guess I started by reading them. The books I read as a child gave me the courage to keep going. I loved them so much. They changed me, they became a part of me, a part of who I am. Then my grade eight teacher told me that I should become an author, that I was a poet. He was the first person who ever told me I could be an author. It had never occurred to me. And even after he said so, the first thing I thought was, “I can’t. Authors are white people.” But I started dreaming about it.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Interviews

Kathy Jessup

How did you get started in storytelling?

I think I've always been a storyteller. I was the kind of kid who talked constantly and drove all the adults around me nuts! Thank goodness I eventually learned to channel my creative energy in to writing stories. When I left high school, I found what I thought was the perfect profession: Broadcast Journalism, a job which encompassed both writing and telling (true) stories. I spent over a decade working for CBC radio in Calgary, but eventually my love of performing drew me in to storytelling circles. Canada has a wonderfully strong network of storytellers, and from the first time I stepped in front of an audience to share a familiar folktale, I was hooked. Over twenty years later, I'm still telling tales, and I know my grade three teacher is out there somewhere, shaking her head in disbelief at how it all turned out!

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Interviews

Jerry Haigh

How did you get started in storytelling?

Without realizing it I have been a teller for a long time. My former students at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine have told me that most of my classes were more like storytelling than formal lectures. Quite by chance I took some voice lessons from a drama teacher at the university who called me a storyteller after I had related a story about some work I had done on chimpanzees in Uganda. After I joined the Saskatoon Storytellers Guild I attended my first formal storytelling conference in Saskatoon and was asked to tell a brief account of the effects of having safari ants up my shorts. From there I continued to enjoy sharing accounts of real wildlife adventures and learning old folk tales about the animals I have worked with.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Interviews

Jacqueline Guest

How did you get started in children’s books?

I know the value in reading. It’s the one skill you learn in school that you will use every day for the rest of your life! But to acquire reading skills, kids need to read – this means there has to be interesting books waiting on the shelf. I wanted to create books that would entertain young readers and keep them turning the pages.

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TD Book Week Blog: I'm Going on Tour! Author Interviews

Lee Edward Födi

How did you get started in children’s books?

I’ve always been a writer. My mom says I was making stories as soon as I could pick up a crayon. I wrote a lot of books as a kid—and they were always books (not just stories). They had covers, title pages, even copyright pages (I don’t think I knew exactly what a copyright page was, but I just copied what I saw in real books). The earliest book I have record of is a hand-made one from when I was five or six. It’s called The Farm 7720. Why is it called that? I have NO idea.

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